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Personnel Staffing, Inc.

Final Wage Payment Requirements by State

State wage payment laws govern when an employer must pay final wages to an employee who has separated from employment. Some state laws make a distinction between when an employer must pay an employee who has been fired (involuntary separation) and an employee who quits (voluntary separation).

State wage payment laws also dictate whether an employer must pay a separated employee the value of his or her accrued but unused vacation time, or whether the employee forfeits the value of this time.

The following chart summarizes each state’s requirements on when to pay final wages to an employee who has separated from employment, how to treat any accrued but unused vacation time and the penalties that apply if an employer fails to comply with these requirements. A notation of “N/A” means there is no law on the issue in the state.

Article by:  Xperthr

Courtesy of:  Personnel Staffing, Inc.

State Payment for Voluntary Separation Payment for Involuntary Separation Treatment of Accrued Vacation Pay Penalties
Alabama N/A N/A N/A N/A
Alaska By the next payday that is at least three days after the employer receives notice of the employee’s separation. Within three working days of the employee’s separation or layoff. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if the employer has agreed to pay it. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for the employee’s final wages from the time the employee demanded them to the time of payment, or a continuation of wages for 90 days, whichever amount is less.
Arizona By the next payday, unless the employer and employee agree to a different payment date. By the next regular payday, or within seven working days of the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be sued by an employee for triple damages, or the employee may file a wage claim with the Industrial Commission (limited to $5,000).
Arkansas By the next payday. Within seven days of the employee’s separation. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if an employment contract or company policy requires payment. An employer that does not pay final wages within seven days after they were due is liable for the final wages, plus up to 60 days of wages payable at the employee’s normal rate of pay.
California Within 72 hours of the employee’s separation, or immediately for employees who give 72 hours’ notice of separation. Immediately upon the employee’s separation or layoff.

Motion picture employees: Within 24 hours of an employee’s separation, or by the next payday for an employee who is laid off.

An employer that provides paid vacations must pay the value of accrued vacation time to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the final wages, plus up to 30 days of wages payable at the employee’s normal pay rate. An employer that willfully fails to pay final wages must pay restitution to the employee.
Colorado By the next payday. Immediately upon the employee’s separation, within six hours of the start of the next workday if the payroll department is not operational, or within 24 hours of the employee’s separation if the payroll department is located off the worksite.

If the employee’s wages are available at the employer’s worksite or local offices but the employee has not received the wages within 60 days of separation, the employer must mail the final paycheck to the employee’s last known mailing address.

The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if the employer has agreed to pay it. An employee may make a written demand for payment of final wages. An employer that fails to pay within 14 days of the demand is liable to the employee for the amount of the unpaid final wages, plus a penalty equal to the amount of unpaid wages, or up to 10 days’ worth of the employee’s average daily wages (which accrue starting from the date the employer receives the written demand), whichever amount is greater. The penalty increases by 50% if the failure to pay is willful.

An employer that fails to answer a DOL complaint for unpaid wages (of up to $7,500) made on behalf of a separated employee will be issued a citation and a notice of assessment for the amount owed plus penalties. The DOL may waive the fines or reduce the penalties assessed by up to 50% if the employer pays the wages within 14 days after receipt of the citation and notice.

Connecticut By the next payday. By the next business day for employees who are fired. By the next payday for employees who are laid off.

Labor disputes: By the next payday.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee An employer that willfully fails to pay final commissions may be liable for two times the amount of the unpaid commissions, plus attorney fees and costs. Employees may recover two times the amount of the unpaid wages. Depending on the amount owed, an employer may be liable for a fine of $200 to $5,000, and/or be imprisoned for three months to five years.
Delaware By the next payday. By the next payday. The value of accrued vacation time, benefits and other wage supplements must be paid to a separated employee within 30 days if the employer has agreed to pay it. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the unpaid wages, or liquidated damages equal to 10% of the unpaid wages per day until paid, excluding Sundays and holidays, whichever amount is less. If an employer is adjudicated bankrupt, liquidated damages do not continue after the date a bankruptcy petition is filed.
District of Columbia By the earlier of the next payday or within seven days of the employee’s separation. By the next work day after the employee’s separation.

Employees who handle money: Within four days after the employee’s separation.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are suspended due to a labor dispute.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for liquidated damages equal to 10% of the unpaid wages per day until paid.
Florida N/A N/A N/A N/A
Georgia N/A N/A N/A N/A
Hawaii By the next payday, or the last day of work for employees who give one pay period’s notice of separation, whichever occurs first. Immediately upon the employee’s separation or by the next day if immediate payment is impossible.

Layoffs: By the next payday for employees who are laid off.

Labor disputes: By the next payday.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages to an employee who is laid off or involved in a labor dispute is liable for the final pay, plus any pay owed at the employee’s usual rate for the three months prior to the closing of business. An employee may sue for unpaid final wages. The employer may be liable for fines ranging from $2,000 to $10,000 per offense, criminal fines of $100 to $10,000, and/or be subject to one year in jail for each violation.
Idaho By the next payday, 10 days after the employee’s separation, or within 48 hours of the employee’s written request for final payment, whichever occurs first. By the next payday, 10 days after the employee’s separation, or within 48 hours of the employee’s written request for final payment, whichever occurs first. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for up to 15 days’ unpaid wages, up to $750. The maximum penalty is $500 if final wages are paid before a lien is filed.
Illinois Immediately upon the employee’s separation, but not later than the next payday. Immediately upon the employee’s separation, but not later than the next payday. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable to the employee for the amount unpaid, plus damages equal to 2% of the amount unpaid.
Indiana By the next payday.

Employee’s whereabouts unknown: By the 10th day after the employee’s demand for payment, or after the employee provides the employer with a current address.

By the next regular payday. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for a penalty equal to 10% of the amount of wages due, per day, up to two times the amount of the unpaid wages.
Iowa By the next regular payday.

Net commissions: Within 30 days of the employee’s separation.

By the next regular payday.

Net commissions: Within 30 days of the employee’s separation.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for a fine equal to $500 per failure, plus liquidated damages equal to 5% per day if the employer fails to pay within seven days of the due date.
Kansas By the next regular payday.

Commissions: Within 30 days or less after the last day of the contract.

By the next regular payday.

Commissions: Within 30 days or less after the last day of the contract.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that willfully fails to pay final wages is liable, beginning on the eighth day the wages remain unpaid, for the amount unpaid, or the amount unpaid plus 1% of those wages per day, excluding Sunday and holidays, whichever is less. If an employer is adjudicated bankrupt, a failure to pay wages will not continue after the date the bankruptcy petition is filed.
Kentucky By the next payday, or within 14 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs later. By the next payday, or within 14 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs later. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be assessed a civil penalty ranging from $100 to $1,000 per offense. Each failure to pay final wages is a separate offense.
Louisiana By the next payday, or within 15 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. By the next payday, or within 15 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for the full amount of the final wages due, or 90 days’ wages at the employee’s daily pay rate, whichever amount is less. The employee is also entitled to reasonable attorney fees.
Maine By the next payday, or within two weeks after the employee’s demand, whichever occurs first. By the next payday, or within two weeks after the employee’s demand, whichever occurs first. An employer that provides paid vacations must pay the value of accrued vacation time to a separated employee.

Employer’s insolvency: Final pay includes the value of accrued vacation time earned by a separated employee and other fringe benefits (e.g., benefits provided under retirement and health plans).

An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for fines ranging from $100 to $500. An employer also may be sued for unpaid wages by an employee or the Maine Department of Labor.
Maryland By the next regular payday. By the next regular payday. The value of accrued vacation time is not payable to a separated employee if the following criteria are met: 1) The employer has a written policy limiting accrued leave; 2) The employee is aware of the policy; and 3) The employee is not entitled to payment under the terms of the policy. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor and liable for fines of up to $1,000. A court may award triple damages to an employee if the employer willfully held wages that were payable.
Massachusetts By the next payday, or the following Saturday if there is no regular payday. Immediately upon the employee’s separation or layoff.

Boston employers: As soon as payrolls are certified.

Manufacturers: A manufacturer that requires employees to forfeit a portion of their final pay if they do not give notice of voluntary separation forfeits a similar amount if it fires an employee without similar notice.

The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if the employer has agreed in writing or verbally to provide paid vacations.

Effective July 1, 2015, an employer has the option to pay accrued sick time with an employee’s final wage payment.

An employer that fails to pay final wages must pay restitution to the employee or a maximum civil penalty of $25,000 per violation. The maximum penalty is reduced to $7,000 if the employer has no prior violations. For a first offense, criminal fines of up to $25,000 may also apply and/or the employer may be imprisoned for up to one year. For a second offense, the criminal fine increases to $50,000 and the maximum jail term is two years.
Michigan By the next regular payday.

Workers under contracts: Final pay must include all wages earned by the separated employee as nearly as they can be estimated if the full amount cannot be determined until the contract terminates; a final payment must be made in full when the contract terminates.

By the next regular payday.

Workers under contracts: Final pay must include all wages earned by the separated employee as nearly as they can be estimated if the full amount cannot be determined until the contract terminates; a final payment must be made in full when the contract terminates.

The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if a written employment contract or policy requires payment. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for civil penalties equal to 10% of the unpaid wages per year, and/or exemplary damages equal to two times the amount of unpaid wages; if the violation is flagrant or repeated, an additional penalty of up to $1,000 may apply. Failing to pay final wages is also a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Employees may sue for unpaid final wages, plus 10% of the amount owed and unpaid.
Minnesota By the next payday, or by the second payday if the first payday is fewer than five calendar days after the employee’s last day of work; the employee must be paid in full within 20 days after the employee’s separation.

Commissions: Not later than three work days after the separation if the employee gives at least five days’ written notice of the separation; final pay is due no later than six days after the separation if the employee did not give notice.

Transitory employees: Within 24 hours of the work’s completion or the employee’s involuntary separation.

Employees who handle money or property: An employer may take 10 calendar days after the separated employee’s final day to conduct an audit; final pay is due thereafter.

Within 24 hours of the separating employee’s demand.

Public service corporations: Immediately upon the employee’s separation, or within a reasonable time after the employee’s demand.

Commissions: Not later than three work days after the separation if the employee gives at least five days’ written notice of the separation; final pay is due not later than six days after the separation if the employee did not give notice.

Transitory employees: Within 24 hours of the work’s completion or the employee’s voluntary separation.

The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if a written employment contract or policy requires payment. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for up to 15 days’ wages at the employee’s regular rate of pay if the wages remain unpaid 24 hours after the employee’s demand.
Mississippi N/A Commissions: Within 21 days of a contract’s termination when the principal does not have a permanent or fixed place of business in Mississippi. N/A Non-Mississippi principals who fail to pay final commissions to a separated sales representative within 21 days of the due date may be liable for up to triple the amount of commissions due and reasonable attorney fees and costs.
Missouri N/A Immediately upon the employee’s separation. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee if a written employment contract or policy requires payment. An employer that fails to pay final wages within seven days of the due date to an employee who is fired is liable for the final wages plus up to 60 days’ wages payable at the employee’s normal rate of pay.
Montana By the next payday, or within 15 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. Immediately upon the employee’s separation, unless company policy extends the time of payment to the next payday, or within 15 days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor and a penalty equal to 110% of the wages owed.
Nebraska By the next payday, or within two weeks after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. By the next payday, or within two weeks after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. The value of accrued vacation time must be paid to a separated employee. Employees may sue to recover unpaid final wages and court costs, including attorney fees equal to 25% of the unpaid wages. An employee may recover double the amount of unpaid final wages if the employer’s failure to pay is willful.
Nevada By the next payday, or within seven days after the employee’s separation, whichever occurs first. Immediately upon the employee’s separation. N/A An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the final wages, plus up to 30 days’ wages payable at the employee’s normal rate of pay.
New Hampshire By the next payday or within 72 hours if the separated employee gives one pay period’s notice. Within 72 hours of the employee’s separation. By the next payday for employees who are laid off.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are suspended.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that willfully fails to pay final wages may be liable for the wages due, or up to 10% of the unpaid wages for each day the final wages remain unpaid, whichever is less. Liquidated damages will not continue after the date a bankruptcy petition is filed, if the employer is eventually adjudicated bankrupt.
New Jersey By the next regular payday.

Commissions: Final pay must include a reasonable estimate of all wages due until the exact amount can be computed.

By the next regular payday.

Labor disputes: Final pay may be delayed an additional 10 days if an employee is suspended as a result of a labor dispute involving employees who prepare the payroll.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. A sales representative who is separated may sue the principal that fails to pay final commissions. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for administrative fees ranging from 10% of the amount due for a first offense, to 25% of the amount due for the second and subsequent offenses. Administrative penalties ranging from $250 for a first offense to $500 for the second and subsequent offenses may also apply.
New Mexico By the next payday. Within five days after the employee’s separation.

Commissions and piece work: Within 10 days after the employee’s separation.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are suspended due to a labor dispute.

N/A An employer that fails to pay final wages may be sued by the employee and may be liable for up to 60 days’ unpaid wages. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be guilty of a petty misdemeanor, and/or fined up to $500 and imprisoned for up to six months for a first offense. Conviction for a second or subsequent offense is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year. Each violation is a separate offense.
New York By the next payday. By the next payday. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for a $500 civil fine per violation. Criminal penalties may also apply. For the first offense, an employer may be guilty of a misdemeanor, with fines ranging from $500 to $20,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year; for a second offense within six years, the employer may be guilty of a felony, with fines ranging from $500 to $20,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year and one day.
North Carolina By the next payday.

Commissions and bonuses: Payment is due on the first regular payday after the amount becomes calculable and is not forfeitable, unless the separated employee has been notified of company policy or practice regarding forfeiture.

By the next payday.

Commissions and bonuses: Payment is due on the first regular payday after the amount becomes calculable and is not forfeitable, unless the separated employee has been notified of company policy or practice regarding forfeiture.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for the unpaid wages, liquidated damages equal to the amount of unpaid final wages, interest and court costs.
North Dakota By the next payday. By the next payday.

Railroad employees: Immediately upon the employee’s separation or upon the employee’s demand.

The value of accrued vacation must be paid to a separated employee, excluding an employee who voluntarily resigns if he or she is employed for less than one year, or if the employee gave fewer than five days’ notice of resignation and the employer provided written notice of these policies when the employee was hired. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the final wages, plus up to 30 days’ wages payable at the employee’s normal rate of pay, plus interest. An employer may be liable for double the amount of unpaid final wages if it was liable for two previous wage claims within one year before the due date, and triple the amount owed if it had three or more previous wage claims.
Ohio By the next payday. By the next payday. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages within 30 days, or within 60 days of an uncontested court filing or judgment, may be liable for the unpaid wages plus 6% of the amount due or $200.
Oklahoma By the next payday. By the next payday. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for liquidated damages equal to 2% of the unpaid wages per day, or the amount of the unpaid final wages, whichever is less. If the employer is eventually adjudicated bankrupt, liquidated damages will not continue after the date a bankruptcy petition is filed.
Oregon By the separated employee’s last day of work if the employee gave at least 48 hours’ notice. By the next payday, or within five days of the employee’s separation if the employee did not give notice, whichever occurs first. An estimate of final pay must be paid within five days of the employee’s separation if the employee did not give notice and was required to turn in time sheets; the remainder is due within five days after time sheets are submitted. By the first business day after the employee’s separation.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are on strike.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the amount of final wages due, plus up to 30 days’ wages payable at the employee’s usual rate of pay, calculated at eight hours a day. Penalties will not be assessed if the employer pays all final wages within five days after the employee submitted a time card. An employer will not be liable for failing to pay final wages if it pays 100% of the amount due within 12 days after receiving notice from the employee.
Pennsylvania By the next payday. By the next payday. An employer must honor company policy or any other agreement that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee who has worked for the employer longer than one year. An employer that fails to pay final wages more than 30 days after the regularly scheduled payday may be liable for liquidated damages equal to 25% of the unpaid wages, or $500, whichever amount is greater. An employer that fails to pay final wages or to satisfactorily explain the failure to the Pennsylvania Secretary of Labor within 10 days may be liable for a penalty equal to 10% of the amount due.
Rhode Island By the next payday.

Business reorganizations: Within 24 hours if the business liquidates, merges or moves to another state.

By the next payday.

Business reorganizations: Within 24 hours if the business liquidates, merges or moves to another state.

Labor disputes: By the next regular payday for employees who are suspended due to a labor dispute.

Vacation pay accrued under company policy must be paid if the employee worked for the employer for at least one year. An employer that fails to pay final wages is liable for the unpaid wages and may also be liable for liquidated damages equal to twice the amount owed. An employer that fails to pay wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined up to $400, and/or imprisoned for 10 to 90 days. An employer that pays an employee’s unpaid final wages to the Department of Labor and Training may be required to pay an administrative fee of 25% of the amount due for the first offense, and 50% of the amount due for the second and any later offenses.
South Carolina Within 48 hours after the employee’s separation or by the next payday, but not more than 30 days after separation. Within 48 hours after the employee’s separation or by the next payday, but not more than 30 days after separation. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay wages may be liable for a fine of up to $100 per offense. An employee may sue an employer for unpaid wages and damages equal to three times the amount unpaid.
South Dakota By the earlier of the next payday or after the separated employee returns the employer’s property. By the earlier of the next payday or after the separated employee returns the employer’s property.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are suspended due to a labor dispute.

N/A In addition to being liable for the unpaid final wages, an employer that oppressively, fraudulently or maliciously refuses to pay wages when due may be liable for damages equal to twice the amount of wages that should have been paid. An employer that intentionally refuses to pay wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor.
Tennessee By the later of the next payday or 21 days after the employee’s separation. By the later of the next payday or 21 days after the employee’s separation. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor and liable for fines ranging from $100 to $500. An employer that commits at least two offenses may be liable for a civil penalty ranging from $500 to $1,000 per offense.
Texas By the next payday. Within six days after the employee’s separation. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that refuses in bad faith to pay final wages may be liable for the unpaid wages or a $1,000 fine, whichever is less. An employer may be guilty of a third degree felony if it hires or intends to continue to employ an employee with the intent to avoid paying wages and if it fails to pay wages after the employee demands payment.
Utah By the next payday. Within 24 hours after the employee’s separation.

Net commissions and employees who handle money: After an audit or verification of sales, accounts, funds or stock.

Labor disputes: By the next payday.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages more than 24 hours after a fired employee’s demand is liable for the final wages, plus up to 60 days’ wages payable at the employee’s usual rate of pay. The employee must sue to recover the final pay.
Vermont By the next payday, or the next Friday if there is no regularly scheduled payday. Within 72 hours of the employee’s separation. An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for a $5,000 fine. Corporate officers may be personally liable for unpaid final wages. An employee may sue an employer for two times the amount of his/her unpaid final wages, plus costs and reasonable attorney fees.
Virginia By the next payday. By the next payday. N/A An employer that fails to pay final wages will be liable for the unpaid wages, plus 8% interest calculated from the date final wages were required to be paid. An employer that knowingly fails to pay final wages may be liable for a $1,000 civil fine per offense. An employer that willfully and with intention to defraud fails to pay up to $9,999 in final wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor; if the amount is $10,000 or more, the employer may be guilty of a felony.
Washington By the next payday unless the employee works for multiple employers in the same industry interchangeably and the employer establishes a plan providing for at least one payday each week, or a collective bargaining agreement provides for payment of final wages at another time. By the next payday unless the employee works for multiple employers in the same industry interchangeably and the employer establishes a plan providing for at least one payday each week, or a collective bargaining agreement provides for payment of final wages at another time. N/A An employer that fails to pay final wages may be guilty of a misdemeanor. An employer may be ordered to pay final wages plus interest at 1% per month, calculated from the date final wages became payable. An employer that fails to pay final wages within 30 days of receiving a notice to pay from the DOLI may be liable for the unpaid wages, plus 10% of the amount due. An employer that willfully fails to pay final wages may be liable for a civil penalty equal to $1,000, or 10% of the amount due, whichever is greater, up to $20,000.
West Virgina By the next payday (effective June 11, 2015). By the next payday (effective June 11, 2015). An employer must pay a separated employee the value of accrued vacation time that is not payable by the next payday according to the terms of an existing employer-employee agreement (effective June 11, 2015). An employer that fails to pay final wages on time may be liable for twice the amount of the unpaid wages as liquidated damages, plus the amount that was not paid when due (effective June 11, 2015).
Wisconsin By the next payday.

Business reorganizations: Within 24 hours if the business liquidates, merges or moves to another state.

By the next payday.

Business reorganizations: Within 24 hours if the business liquidates, merges or moves to another state.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that fails to pay final wages may be liable for a $500 fine and/or imprisoned for up to 90 days for each offense; the employer may also be liable for the unpaid final wages and up to 100% of the amount required to be paid, depending on when payment is made.
Wyoming By the next regular payday. By the next regular payday.

Labor disputes: By the next payday for employees who are suspended due to a labor dispute.

An employer must honor company policy that requires the value of accrued vacation time to be paid to a separated employee. An employer that willfully fails to pay final wages is guilty of a misdemeanor and liable for a fine ranging from $500 to $750 per offense. In addition to final wages owed, an employee is entitled to 18% interest calculated from the separation date.